Zu Hauptinhalt springen
Startseite UR

Dr. Magdalena Abel

CV

Education

  • 2008 Diploma in Psychology, Regensburg University
  • 2012 Ph.D. in Psychology, Regensburg University
    Thesis: "Sleep-associated and retrieval-associated memory                            consolidation"


Professional Experience

  • 2009-2012 Research Assistant at Psychology Department
    (Head: Prof. K.-H. T. Bäuml, Regensburg University)
  • 2012-2014 Post-Doctoral Position at Psychology Department
    (Head: K.-H. T. Bäuml, Regensburg University)
  • 2014-2015 Post-Doctoral Position at Psychology Department
    (Head: H. L. Roediger III, Washington University/USA)
  • 2015-now Post-Doctoral Position at Psychology Department
    (Head: K.-H. T. Bäuml, Regensburg University)


Ad hoc Reviewer for

Applied Cognitive Psychology / Memory / Memory & Cognition / Neurobiology of Learning and Memory / Psychological Science / Psychonomic Bulletin & Review / Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Psychology

Teaching

Summer Term 2017

  • Seminar (Bachelor): Developmental Psychology
  • Seminar (Bachelor): Memory

Winter Term 2016/17

  • Practical Course (Master): Practical Research Course
  • Seminar (Bachelor): Human Decision Making

publications

Publications

  • Abel, M. & Bäuml, K.-H. T. (in press). Collaborative remembering revisited: Study context access modulates collaborative inhibition and later benefits for individual memory. Memory & Cognition.
  • Abel, M., Umanath, S., Wertsch, J. W., & Roediger, H. L. (in press). Collective memory: How groups remember their past. In M. L. Meade, A. Barnier, P. Van Bergen, C. Harris, & J. Sutton (Eds.), Collaborative remembering: How remembering with others influences memory. New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Bäuml, K.-H. T., Aslan, A., & Abel, M. (2017). The two faces of selective memory retrieval - cognitive, developmental, and social processes. In B. Ross (Ed.), The Psychology of Learning and Motivation (Vol. 66). Academic Press: Elsevier Inc.
  • Abel, M. & Roediger, H. L. III (2017). Comparing the testing effect under blocked and mixed practice: The mnemonic benefits of retrieval practice are not affected by practice format. Memory & Cognition, 45, 81-92.
  • Abel, M. & Bäuml, K.-H. T. (2017). Testing the context-change account of list-method directed forgetting: The role of retention interval. Journal of Memory and Language, 92, 170-182.
  • Abel, M. & Bäuml, K.-H. T. (2016). Retrieval practice can eliminate list-method directed forgetting. Memory & Cognition, 44, 15-23.
  • Roediger, H. L. III & Abel, M. (2015). Collective memory: a new arena of cognitive study. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 19, 359-361.
  • Abel, M. & Bäuml, K.-H. T. (2015). Selective memory retrieval in social groups: When silence is golden and when it is not. Cognition, 140, 40-48. 
  • Bäuml, K.-H. T., Holterman, C., & Abel, M. (2014). Sleep can reduce the testing effect - it enhances recall of restudied items but can leave recall of retrieved items unaffected. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 40, 1568-1581.
  • Abel, M. & Bäuml, K.-H. T. (2014). Sleep can reduce proactive interference. Memory, 22, 332-339.
  • Abel, M. & Bäuml, K.-H. T. (2014). The roles of delay and retroactive interference in retrieval-induced forgetting. Memory & Cognition, 42, 141-150.
  • Abel, M. & Bäuml, K.-H. T. (2013). Adaptive Memory: The influence of sleep and wake delay on the survival-processing effect. Journal of Cognitive Psychology, 25, 917-924.
  • Abel, M. & Bäuml, K.-H. T. (2013). Sleep can eliminate list-method directed forgetting. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 39, 946-952.
  • Abel, M. & Bäuml, K.-H. T. (2012). Retrieval-induced forgetting, delay, and sleep. Memory, 20, 420-428.

Talks and Posters (as presenting author)

  • Abel, M., Umanath, S., Shaffer, R. A., Wertsch, J. V., & Roediger, H. L. III (2017). Remembering the 10 most important events of World War II: Similarities and differences across 11 countries. International Convention of the Association for Psychological Science (ICPS), Vienna, Austria. [talk]
  • Abel, M. & Bäuml, K.-H. T. (2016). The two faces of selective memory retrieval in social groups. 6th International Conference on Memory (ICOM), Budapest, Hungary. [talk]
  • Abel, M. & Roediger, H. L. III (2016). Can testing effects be socially shared? 6th International Conference on Memory (ICOM), Budapest, Hungary. [poster]
  • Abel, M. & Bäuml, K.-H. T. (2016). Engaging in remembering together with others: Is collaboration at test always detrimental for memory performance?  Travelling in Time Conference at Con Amore (Center on Autobiographical Memory Research), Aarhus, Denmark. [poster]
  • Abel, M. & Bäuml, K.-H. T. (2016). Collaborative memory revisited: Does collaboration at test always decrease recall? 58. TeaP, Heidelberg, Germany. [talk]
  • Abel, M. & Bäuml, K.-H. T. (2015). Testing the context-change account of list-method directed forgetting: The role of retention interval. 56th Annual Meeting of the Psychonomic Society, Chicago, USA. [poster]
  • Abel, M. & Bäuml, K.-H. T. (2015). Selective memory retrieval in social groups: Listening to others can reduce and enhance memory for unmentioned information. 27th Annual Convention of the Association for Psychological Science, New York, USA. [poster]
  • Abel, M., Holterman, C., & Bäuml, K.-H. T. (2014). Sleep benefits memories after restudy, but not after retrieval practice: Evidence for the distribution-based bifurcation model of the testing effect. 55th Annual Meeting of the Psychonomic Society, Long Beach, USA. [talk, select-speaker award]
  • Abel, M. & Bäuml, K.-H. T. (2014). Interpolated retrieval practice counteracts list-method directed forgetting. 56. TeaP, Gießen, Germany. [talk]
  • Abel, M. & Bäuml, K.-H. T. (2013). Retrieval-induced forgetting: Effects of retroactive interference on practiced and unpracticed items. 54th Annual Meeting of the Psychonomic Society, Toronto, Canada. [poster]
  • Abel, M. & Bäuml, K.-H. T. (2013). Schlaf kann Gerichtetes Vergessen aufheben. 39. Psychologie und Gehirn, Würzburg, Germany. [talk]
  • Abel, M. & Bäuml, K.-H. T. (2013). Sleep can eliminate list-method directed forgetting. 55. TeaP, Vienna, Austria. [talk]
  • Abel, M. & Bäuml, K.-H. T. (2012). Sleep can eliminate list-method directed forgetting. 10th Anniversary of the Laboratory for Sleep, Cognition and Consciousness Research, Salzburg, Austria. [talk]
  • Abel, M. & Bäuml, K.-H. T. (2012). Retrieval practice consolidates practiced and related unpracticed memories. 54. TeaP, Mannheim, Germany. [talk]
  • Abel, M. & Bäuml, K.-H. T. (2011). Retrieval practice consolidates practiced and related unpracticed memories. 52nd Annual Meeting of the Psychonomic Society, Seattle, USA. [talk]
  • Abel, M. & Bäuml, K.-H. T. (2011). Does sleep stabilize voluntary forgetting? 5th International Conference on Memory (ICOM), York, United Kingdom [poster]
  • Abel, M. & Bäuml, K.-H. T. (2011). Wird willentliches Vergessen durch Schlaf konsolidiert? 53. TeaP, Halle (Saale), Germany. [talk]
  • Abel, M. & Bäuml, K.-H. T. (2010). Schlaf, Abruf und episodisches Gedächtnis. 52. TeaP, Saarbrücken, Germany. [poster]

grants

Daad 450-32 B

2014-2015
Retrieval practice promotes memory performance: the influence of blocked and mixed practice

with Henry L. Roediger III

Research on the so-called testing effect demonstrates that active retrieval practice improves memory more than passive restudy does. While most experimental studies on the topic applied blocked practice designs, with retrieval practice and restudy broken down into clearly separable blocks, in our daily lives the two kinds of reprocessing often occur in a mixed and randomly interleaved fashion. The present research proposal therefore examines the influence of blocked vs. mixed practice on the beneficial effects of retrieval practice.

  1. Fakultät für Psychologie, Pädagogik und Sportwissenschaft
  2. Institut für Psychologie

Dr. Magdalena Abel

Regensburg University
Psychology Department
Universitätsstraße 31
93053 Regensburg, Germany

Lena

Office: PT, Room 4.1.44
Phone 0941 943-3866
Fax     0941 943-3872

E-Mail

Office hour: Tue 10-11